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InvestingRRSPSegregated FundsTFSARetirement PlanningTax Planning

5 Ways to Avoid Capital Gains Tax

Capital Gains tax occurs when you sell capital property for more than you paid for it. In Canada, you are only taxed on 50% of your capital gain. For example, if you bought an investment for $25,000 and sold it for $75,000 you would have a capital gain of $50,000.   You would then be taxed on 50% of the gain. In this instance, you would pay tax on $25,000.   In Canada, there are some legitimate ways to avoid paying this tax:  Tax shelters, Lifetime Capital Gains Exemption, Capital Losses, Deferring, and Charitable Giving.

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Critical Illness InsuranceDisability Income ReplacementLifestyle TipsLong Term CareRetirement Planning

Why Living Benefits Are the Foundation of Your Financial Tool Kit

Imagine you woke up today and could no longer go to work – Would you be able to pay your bills? What if you are diagnosed with cancer and must travel for treatments? Could you afford to lose your income and pay for healthcare expenses?

For most Canadians, the answer is no. A survey conducted by RBC found that 50% of Canadians could not afford to take time off work if needed. Luckily, there is a solution available.

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InvestingWealth Accumulation

How To Protect Your Assets Against Inflation

Ever feel like your money is not going as far as it used to?   Do not worry, you are not imagining it.  You can blame inflation.   Inflation is the rising price of goods and services over time.  This rise impacts your purchasing power. Though it can be discouraging to think that inflation is eating away at the value of your assets, economists consider a small amount of inflation indicative of a healthy economy.  Inflation encourages consumer spending and corporate productivity.

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InvestingRRSPSegregated FundsLife StagesRetirement PlanningTax Planning

Converting an RRSP to a RRIF 2021

If you are nearing retirement, you may be starting to think about creating retirement income for yourself from your RRSPs.  Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) are considered accumulation vehicles.   This means they are used to save for your retirement in a tax efficient way.  When the time comes to start using your hard-earned savings to fund your retirement, you may want to consider moving them to a payout vehicle called a Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF). 

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Lifestyle TipsLife InsuranceLife Stages

A Step-by-Step Guide to Conducting a Life Insurance Audit

tend to neglect the insurance part of their portfolio, but it is one of the most important tools you can have as a part of a financial plan.   Just like your investments or other assets it should be reviewed regularly to ensure it is still protecting you in the ways that you need it to.  The steps below will help you get started on your own life insurance audit.

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InvestingSegregated FundsTFSATax Planning

What Happens If You Overcontribute to Your TFSA?

The amount deposited into a Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) is subject to a yearly contribution limit. For 2020, and again in 2021, the annual limit has been set at $6,000. As of 2021 the lifetime maximum contribution has grown to $75,500.
If an over-contribution is made Canada Revenue Agency will levy penalties.

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Disclaimer

This information is designed to educate and inform you of financial strategies and products currently available. As each individual’s circumstances differ, it is important to review the suitability of these concepts for your particular needs with a Qualified Financial Advisor.