Segregated Funds

5 Ways to Avoid Capital Gains Tax

Capital Gains tax occurs when you sell capital property for more than you paid for it. In Canada, you are only taxed on 50% of your capital gain. For example, if you bought an investment for $25,000 and sold it for $75,000 you would have a capital gain of $50,000.   You would then be taxed on 50% of the gain. In this instance, you would pay tax on $25,000.   In Canada, there are some legitimate ways to avoid paying this tax:  Tax shelters, Lifetime Capital Gains Exemption, Capital Losses, Deferring, and Charitable Giving.

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Converting an RRSP to a RRIF 2021

If you are nearing retirement, you may be starting to think about creating retirement income for yourself from your RRSPs.  Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) are considered accumulation vehicles.   This means they are used to save for your retirement in a tax efficient way.  When the time comes to start using your hard-earned savings to fund your retirement, you may want to consider moving them to a payout vehicle called a Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF). 

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What Happens If You Overcontribute to Your TFSA?

The amount deposited into a Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) is subject to a yearly contribution limit. For 2020, and again in 2021, the annual limit has been set at $6,000. As of 2021 the lifetime maximum contribution has grown to $75,500.
If an over-contribution is made Canada Revenue Agency will levy penalties.

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What You Need to Know About Guaranteed Minimum Withdrawal Benefit Annuities

Guaranteed Withdrawal Benefits, or GMWB, are options in some segregated fund contracts that allow the policy holder to receive a guaranteed income for life. These types of contracts can be appealing for retirees looking for a guaranteed income stream and who are nervous about market fluctuations.

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Essential Tax Numbers for 2019, 2020 and 2021

With a new year comes new tax numbers! Below is a quick reference of important tax numbers for three years, including 2021. CRA has utilized a 1% indexing (inflation) for those numbers subject to that condition.

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The Saving Versus Mortgage Dilemma: How to Best Utilize

Investors often are conflicted on what to do with surplus cash. Your options for available cash usually fall into three categories:  spending it, investing it, …

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Creating and Maintaining an Estate Plan

While uncomfortable to think about, effectively planning ahead for when you are no longer here can save your loved ones a great deal of time, money, and emotional hardship. Estate planning can be complicated, but there are some basic “must-do’s” that should be regularly updated and reviewed. Below is a simple checklist for making sure your estate plan is up to date.

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6 Tips for More Successful Investing

There is no one and done way to invest, but there are a few tried and true principles that have served investors well over the years.

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RESPs and Grandparents 2020 Update

The cost of university has risen sharply, and so has the importance of graduating with a desired and marketable set of skills and knowledge. Without a post-secondary education, employment and life opportunities are more limited now than ever before. Contributing to a grandchild’s education helps them and their parents, and helps you stay connected in a meaningful way.

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RRSP vs TFSA

Whether you should invest in a Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) or a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) is a question that affects almost every investor, regardless of age or amount of savings. For most, the answer is a bit of both. If you have a looming short or medium-term need (under five years) that will require funds, the untaxed TFSA withdrawals is likely the right choice. For longer term, retirement needs, you’ll want to invest in an RRSP.

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